Make Sports Coed Redux

A few months ago I made the argument that schools should move towards a coed model of sports.  The logic behind those arguments can be found here, and I stand behind the basic concept. I was surprised to find, during August inservice, that a former student was denied a place on the high school field... Continue Reading →

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Big Picture, Little Picture Data

My admins have begun to ask good questions that require data to form the answer, and as a result have given me access to vast amounts of data to explore with.  After answering their initial questions, one admin began to talk about using data in a Response to Intervention (RtI) type model.  A big believer... Continue Reading →

Why Mapping Data Matters

I am going to post on how to use Google Tables to map student data, but I wanted to explain why you might want to do it separately.  You, I am sure, can find a dozen uses for mapping data.  Here are a few of mine: Knowing the Community: I do not live where I... Continue Reading →

Unknown Known

There are the known knowns; there are things we know we know.  We also know there are known unknowns; that is to say we know there are some things we do not know.  But there are also unknown unknowns--there are things we do not know we don't know. --Donald Rumsfeld, Secretary of Defense under George... Continue Reading →

Aggregate Not Facilitate

I remember the interview well: "So, you're a facilitator, more than a teacher." This was in response to my description of the student-centered model I had presented. I have always struggled with letting go of control, having once believed that a good lecturer was the key element to a transformative class. Now, I aspire to... Continue Reading →

Make Sports Co-ed

Two years ago our administration told us not to use gender in our classroom. It had come up when students were asked to pack-up the room for the day--boys putting away materials, girls stacking chairs. It was one of many daily sorts we do, and students self-designated their gender and responsibility, but one student who... Continue Reading →

Power Law, Bell Curves and 100%

In 2014 all students could read and do math.  Fact.  That's what the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) law promised.  100%! No, in reality, we fell short.  We did as well as law enforcement solved the crime problem--our focus got better (standards!  Common Core!), we used new tools (statistics!) and the numbers went down.  It... Continue Reading →

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